Tag Archives: Netflix

Small Crimes: Review

Film Score: 3 out of 5 (Good)

Synopsis: Along the spectrum of small town crime thrillers, Small Crimes lays nestled between Blue Velvet and Blue Ruin. Disgraced ex-cop, Joe (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau), returns to his hometown of Bradley County where only Joe himself is deluded by his gimmick of reformation. Joe’s past actions cause his present to become a litany of dire situations from which he tries to escape.

The name Small Crimes alludes to Joe’s delusion about what he really is. From the film’s beginning, Joe’s reformed persona is a facade as he brazenly displays his sobriety chip to the prison pastor. Despite returning to a town where he is reviled, Joe desperately clings to his act, scrambling to prepare excuses for family and victims alike.

Joe’s conflict with his duality, between the man he is and the man he claims to be, personifies Bradley County. Symbolised by the division of the local newspaper’s front page between the upcoming pumpkin festival and Joe’s release, Bradley is torn between its idealised image and its reality of vice and crime, as seen below. Every citizen in Bradley except Joe’s parents pretend to be someone else; from the reservist Scotty (Macon Blair) who spends his downtime in the local bar still dressed in his army uniform to the morally righteous D.A., Phil Coakley (Michael Kinney). The only person at ease with their duality is the ironically named Lieutenant Pleasant, Joe’s former partner who remains in the pay of the local crime family. Pleasant is played by Gary Cole with a refined humour oscillating between the dark and the mildly obscene that adds to his menace.

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The Newspaper of Bradley, caught between pumpkins and corrupt cops

Small Crimes’s exploration of the reality behind the American icon of the rural small town is a well tread trope beginning with Blue Velvet. The film’s uniqueness stems from its protagonist being a reluctant villain instead of a hero tackling the darkness within the town. Macon Blair, George Cole, and Nikolaj Coster-Waldau imbibe Small Crimes with enough dark humour that the film never gags on its own tension.

Director Evan Katz has delivered a visually solid film with glitters of brilliance. Brief cuts to townsfolk, from a taxi driver’s glare or the librarian’s following eyes subtly denote Joe’s infamy. Little details are repeatedly focused upon like the blood stains on the pickup truck borrowed from Joe’s father. This consistently adds an observantly dark humour through image alone, similar to Blue Ruin and Green Room. The overlap between these two films is unsurprising given that Macon Blair who plays Scotty, and co-adapted Small Crimes from David Zeltserman’s novel, also starred in Blue Ruin and Green Room. The plot falls into an expected spiral but has enough originality and twists in Joe’s descent to be refreshing.

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Hatred, condensed into one look

The acting in Small Crimes is excellent. Similarities appear between Joe and Jaime Lannister, the role in Game of Thrones that Nikolaj Coster-Waldau is famous for. Both characters involve an unhealthy degree of narcissism. However Jaime Lannister is a morally ambiguous anti-hero while Joe is a desperate man in denial about who he is. Despite Joe’s acts both past and present, he remained an understandable soul which is to the credit of Nikolaj Coster-Waldau. Molly Parker, of House of Cards fame, is Joe’s love interest, Charlotte. Parker depicts someone who is loving but through her dialogue and physical demeanour, Charlotte enigmatically infers that her past is equally as dark as Joe’s. I am excited to see Molly Parker’s performance in Netflix’s latest Stephen King adaptation, 1922

The true star of Small Crimes is Robert Forster as Joe Sr, a man whose rounded shoulders show the guilt he bears for what his son has become. Robert Forster breathes life into this honourable working class man trying to maintain peace between Joe Jr and Joe’s mother Irma (Jacki Weaver) who is fervently distrustful of her son. At a time where Al Pacino and Robert De Niro find themselves in comedic bits, it is good to see older stars receive genuine roles because acting is a skill that never stops maturing.

Small Crimes, currently available on Netflix, is a good independent film with solid performances and plenty of dark humour. I would recommend it to Cohen brothers fans and those looking for a decent Sunday film.

By Saul Shimmin

For the trailer, see below;

 

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The Mist (Black and White Director’s Cut)

Film Score: 4 out of 5 (Excellent)

Synopsis: Based on the Stephen King novella of the same name, the town of Bridgton, Maine becomes shrouded in a deadly mist, teeming with creatures from the dark corners of another dimension.  Local painter, David Drayton (Thomas Jane), alongside his son, Billy (Nathan Gamble), and their neighbour, Brent Norton (Andre Braugher), become trapped along with many others in the local grocery store as the mist descends upon the town. Protected from the Lovecraftian horrors outside, the movie’s true monster becomes human nature once the vestiges of society melt away.

Despite being director Frank Darabont’s third adaptation of a Stephen King novel following The Shawshank Redemption and The Green Mile, Dimension Films opposed releasing The Mist in black and white. Fortunately, Darabont was able to include his preferred black and white cut as an extra when The Mist was transferred to DVD. Having been in London last week, I stumbled across a showing of The Mist in black and white at the B.F.I. as part of its ongoing Stephen King season. Admittedly, I am not a horror fan by nature as stated in my review for IT, but Darabont’s past work persuaded me to watch the film.

The absence of colour exudes an unsettling sense of illusion, symbolising how the town is in limbo between established reality and a different dimension altogether. Drenched in black and white, the mist becomes alive, developing into a grainy wall like background noise in a bad photograph. The mist watches the trapped townsfolk through the plate glass storefront, as they too observe the fog keeping them captive. When the camera does stare into the mist, the film sheds away any sound, plunging you into an isolating snowdrift and trapping you with the townspeople.  The choice to remove colour nods to Darabont drawing from horror and sci-fi films he watched in the 1960s. The night scenes in particular mirror the eeriness of George. A. Romero’s Night of The Living Dead from 1968.

Watching The Mist in 2017, the film is an indirect prelude to Darabont’s work on The Walking Dead. Three actors in The Mist have major roles in The Walking Dead and both stories pit ordinary people against a ubiquitous and unknown apocalyptic event. Once disbelief and shock ebbs away the two stories are an account of human nature separated from the old world. Darabont split from AMC after The Walking Dead‘s first season, but in The Mist he perceives humanity’s base nature through a dark lens. Darabont’s views are personified by Ollie Weeks, the bespectacled and softly spoken assistant store manager portrayed by British actor Toby Jones. Jones has been a favourite of mine since playing a coroner in my childhood guilty pleasure, the television show Midsomer Murders. Weeks, appearing initially as a downtrodden and outright boring man changes character as The Mist progresses. He bravely aids David Drayton while cynically narrating about human weaknesses as others around them crumble.

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Toby Jones as unlikely hero Ollie Weeks on the left. To the right is Jeffrey DeMunn, better known as Dale in The Walking Dead, as local citizen Dan Miller.

Both Stephen King and Darabont understand that believable characters are a mix of good casting and great writing. That blend is evident in The Mist. Having never seen the film beforehand, it was surprising to recognise many of the actors from major films or television shows. The actors excel in roles reflecting the types of real people found in small communities, from the excessively proud mechanic Jim (William Sadler) to local eccentric Mrs. Carmody (Marcia Gay Harden). The Mist often diverts away from David Drayton and observes other characters interacting with each other; humorously at first until their personalities divide reflecting the mounting division and savagery across the makeshift community. The only recent film to delve into the politics of crisis was Alien: Covenant, which did a comparable job of showing power shift between survivors. The Mist‘s account of human nature transforms the film into a supernatural equivalent of Lord of The Flies. The only flat character was the neighbour, Brent Norton, depicted by Andre Braugher, famous for his role as Captain Raymond Holt in Brooklyn Nine-Nine. It was disappointing to see Braugher’s clear acting prowess be undervalued yet again by  playing another straight character.

The creatures of The Mist do have a certain creepiness. The monochrome effect of the black and white cut makes the monsters appear like B Movie abominations, ready to lurch from the screen at you. The lack of colour does rejuvenate CGI animations that are now ten years old. Returning to the more recent Stephen King film IT, the personal difference between simple scares and real horror is when something leaves a deep seated unease after watching. The Mist sometimes scares but deeply disturbs by thrusting rational people into an unending and unwinnable disaster. The Mist’s proposition and its conclusion are rare in cinema, because even in apocalyptic films like Mad Max, goodness and hope prevails. The Mist follows The Road in battling against our human need for optimism by asking;

‘What could be done if the end truly means the end?’

The Mist hints at how deliciously darker The Walking Dead could have been under Darabont’s continued direction, but for his acrimonious split with AMC. In likelihood, The Walking Dead would have delved further into grittier overtones rather than becoming a sequence of similar obstacles with predictable outcomes.

Thomas Jane is in another adaptation of a Stephen King novella this year called 1922 which is being released on Netflix next month.

If you have yet to see The Mist, do watch it in black and white. If you have already seen it in colour, give the director’s cut a try. Unfortunately, no trailer exists for the black and white’s directors cut. Below is the standard trailer for The Mist, along with Frank Darabont’s introduction to the black and white version, which will hopefully persuade you to choose his cut over the colour version.

By Saul Shimmin

The Mist trailer:

 

Introduction to the black and white cut by Frank Darabont:

 

Trailer Roundup: September [Part II]

This is a follow up to our last trailer roundup, and we’ll start with the least enticing trailer and end with our favorite.

Tomb Raider

Release Date: March 2018

Starring the talented Alicia Vikander as Laura Croft (a fact Warner Bros. won’t let us forget anytime soon.. oh did we mention she’s an ACADEMY AWARD WINNER?), Laura Croft is Warner Bros’ next effort to reboot dead franchises after its flawed attempts to resuscitate King Kong and Godzilla. I have little hope that Warner Bros can rejuvenate what was a mediocre franchise to begin with despite starring Angelina Jolie.

I must admit the cast is beyond enticing. It stars one of my favorite TV stars, Walton Goggins, as the movie’s antagonist and features a small part by Nick Frost. But a good cast won’t persuade me to watch this Indiana Jones knock-off. I’m tired of movies where the plot is drive by “if [fill in the blank] succeeds, our world is in danger.”

 

Murder on the Orient Express

Release Date: November 10, 2017

I am nervous about this remake of Agatha Christie’s classic novel and the 1974 film starring Albert Finney as Hercule Poirot. While the cast is beyond stellar and I am a fan of Kenneth Branagh’s direction, the only reason I can see for remaking it is Fox studio execs saying, “which movies can we remake that will get audiences to unquestioningly open their wallets.” Murder on the Orient Express is the answer.

This is not a reason a movie should be made or remade. If the original was garbage, remake it. If the original was well acted, but the technology of the day was lacking to make the special effects pop, remake it. But the 1974 version was none of these things. Fox should have put their money towards making an original murder-mystery in the same vein as an Agatha Christie novel or penned a script for one of her lesser known books. But I’ll still go see it like the sucker I am.

I do believe theses actors will bring their A game. Especially Johnny Depp who has endured a string of flops. With his private life in shambles and Forbes bestowing him with the title of Hollywood’s The Most Overpaid Actor, Depp will be wanting to reestablish himself as the great actor he is and clear his tarnished name.

 

Isle of Dogs

Release Date: March 23, 2018

Wes Anderson is the king of light-hearted, yet heartfelt humor originating in the strangest of places. I am so stoked for this movie and quite angry that we are still a half a year away from its release date.

Despite the plot’s simplicity, I think this movie will be a success due its understated humor that comes from the childish, dog monologues like the one at the end of the trailer. I was rolling over laughing when I heard it. I’m glad films like this one are being made.

———————Bonus Trailer———————

Marvel’s The Punisher

Release Date: Late 2017

I know, I know, this is a TV show trailer, but, as you know from my John Wick 2 review, I love some good action and having Jon Bernthal (swiftly becoming one of my favorite actors) as the lead doesn’t hurt.

While the trailer made the plot sound formulaic as hell (Government out to kill one man for the secrets he knows), this does not mean the show will fall into hackneyed plot devices. Look at the Jason Bourne series. It rocked this plot (except the most recent film). If you’ve seen season two of Daredevil, you know Frank Castle is one of the most badass characters in TV and movies. I cannot wait for this show. Hopefully it will deliver more than The Defenders.

Trailer Roundup: September

Following this summer’s box office slump, here a few films to look forward to!

Hostiles

Release date: Currently travelling between film festivals, no set date for the cinema release

The Work

Release date:  Out now in the U.K.


Arriving from nowhere, a trailer for The Work suddenly appeared two weeks ago at my local independent cinema and fortunately it is available in the U.K since Friday 8 September.

Focusing upon a group therapy session over four days between Folsom Prison inmates and outsiders, the trailer alone bristles with intensity and is definitely not a documentary to miss. Hopefully there will be more throat signing in the actual film, which I have reviewed here.

Brawl in Cell Block 99

Release date: 6 October 2017 in the U.S.

Directed and written by S. Craig Zahler who directed Bone Tomahawk which Hagood reviewed and enjoyed here. 

Vince Vaughn made a good anti-hero in the glimpses I caught of HBO’s True Detective‘s second season. Vaughn’s new role in Brawl in Cell Block 99 as boxer-turned-drug dealer Bradley Thomas follows that anti-hero thread. Unlike True Detective, Zahler has really used Vaughn’s natural physicality. Ignoring the bald head and crucifix tattoo combo Vaughn is rocking, he is naturally quite a scary guy, especially when practising his boxing on an innocent Suburu as shown in the trailer.

I cannot wait to see this film, in part due to how well the music choice fits the trailer, which is always a good sign.

Shot Caller

Release date: 18 August 2017 in the U.S. (out now)

There is definitely an unintentional prison theme going on in this article.

Nikoloaj Coster-Waldau plays Jacob Harlon, a respectable family man, who after a car accident, winds up in a maximum security prison where he slowly and tragically becomes ensconced in prison life. Alongside Nikolaj is Lake Bell, Jon Bernthal, recently in Baby Driverand Jeffrey Donovan.

For a film with a respectable cast, Shot Caller has received almost nought attention from the media and little exposure in cinemas. Unfortunately, Shot Caller is not the only film this year that has been forgotten by the film industry as I stated in my piece about Netflix here.

The main star is Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, better known for his role as Jaime Lannister in Game of Thrones. Alongside Netflix original Small Crimes in which Nikolaj plays a Jamie-esque character minus the incest, there seems to be a trickling current to propel the actor as a veritable film star. Shot Caller might not get Nikolaj public recognition, but it will hopefully get filmmakers interested in him.

Lady Bird

Release Date: November 10

What’s a trailer round up without an A24 film? Released a week ago, this trailer shows what appears to be a semi-light hearted coming of age movie in a similar vein to last year’s Age of Seventeen. The film stars Brooklyn and Hana actress Saoirse Ronan and Manchester By The Sea standout, Lucas Hedges.

Here at Title Roll, we’re huge fans of A24’s mission and work to bring smaller, indie films to the large screen. While sometimes coming of age films fall flat, Lady Bird seems to have struck a nice quirky tone with its main character, “Lady Bird” who is a strong willed, Catholic high schooler. She wants to rebel against everyone including her similarly stubborn mother (Laura Metcalf) and it is in such familial struggles where often great movies are separated from mediocre films.

We shall see if first time director Greta Gerwig (who also wrote the script) can strike this delicate balance between angsty (but sometimes funny) teenager outbursts and serious, family drama. We’re hopeful she will.

The Valley of Shadows

Release date: 20 October 2017 in Norway, elsewhere not confirmed

I thought I should add this as a final choice. The beautifully stark Norweigan background which becomes hauntingly ethereal as the trailer unfolds makes the film feel like a cross between Pan’s Labyrinth and Let The Right One In .

The plot revolves around Alask, a young boy living in a rural Norweigan town who believes a werewolf is stalking the land. While The Valley of Shadows may not be released in the Anglophone world anytime soon, it is one to look out for.

By Saul Shimmin and Hagood Grantham

Netflix & Nolan

During a recent interview with Indie Wire, champion of traditional cinema and auteur of our age Christopher Nolan attacked streaming giant Netflix and its approach towards the traditional theatrical distribution of films. Netflix is meeting opposition from the film establishment, shown by the negative reaction and booing that flagship film Okja received at Cannes.  Nolan’s words could be dismissed as part of this knee-jerk reaction from the cinematic old guard loathsome towards change.

In reality, Nolan is right to call Netflix’s strategy to disrupt traditional cinema absurd’. Nolan may not realise it in his interview, but he touches upon some deeper issues with both Netflix and the film industry today.

Fighting a content war

In Nolan’s own words, Netflix’s extensive investment in original content, along with liberal control afforded to writers and directors;’would be more admirable if it weren’t being used as some kind of bizarre leverage against shutting down theaters’. Netflix, successful in revolutionising television, perceives cinema as an extension of that industry, and the company says as much in its quarterly shareholder letter this July . Cinema and television are similar but distinct visual arts that need different approaches to conquer. Netflix won over television so quickly because an episode of an original series is far shorter than a feature length film. People are more willing to gamble twenty to fifty minutes on a show recommended by a friend than sit down and dedicate up to two hours to an unknown film which has few reviews from critics or approvals on Netflix.

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An early rise has become mandatory for my summer job. In the mornings before I tackle the commute I watch the business reports while sipping coffee and pretending to be a grownup. Last week CNBC Europe’s Squawk Box had a heated discussion about booming tech shares. One of the presenters quipped that both Amazon and Netflix are locked in a content bidding war. I nodded along with the other hosts in approval.

Threatened by Amazon, Netflix has turned to cinema to retain existing subscribers and grab new ones from abroad. It is not suprising that after expanding into South East Asia last year, Netflix heavily invested into Okja, a Korean- American film directed by Bong Joon- ho, a South Korean directot with a strong appeal in the West and in the South East.

Unlike Amazon, Netflix sees cinema as a territory to be conquered for spoils, rather than an ally. Cinema and Netflix could certainly prosper together. For far too long cinema has been constrained by the ball and chain of the blockbuster and its inevitable franchise, leading to a torrid cycle of hollow superhero sagas, action flicks and CGI puppet shows of monsters and robots. Netflix is an outsider to the film industry, its independence and cash could have freed up film from some of the commercial demands placed upon it. Amazon Studios, as Nolan points out in his interview has taken a more tactful course, debuting films in cinemas before releasing them to its Amazon Prime subscribers 90 days later. Through this, Amazon Studios loses nothing and gains everything, it keeps cinema and critics happy, while generating revenue from film viewers and subscribers.

Where is Buster’s Mal Heart?

Over the last year there have been more films that I have wanted to see than films I have seen, not due to bad luck or poor time management, but because many of the films I anticipated never appeared. From the Lost City of Z to Song to Song and Buster’s Mal Heart, there have been a slew of films which I have highly anticipated, only for them to have minimal runs at local cinemas or no screenings at all.

Cinema is art and art always needs to be championed. Making cinema or any other form of art more accessible or available does not equate to a larger audience for that art, after all people need to know about a museum before they will ever visit. Netflix has assumed that once it makes its original films available, subscribers will flock to them but the opposite reaction is more probable.  Okja was lavished with media attention and an advertising campaign, but so far I have found the smaller independent films created by Netflix to be far more enjoyable. Okja often felt like the director was trying to spend the leftovers of his enormous budget. Whole scenes in Okja were unnecessary and some of the major actors in the film, especially Giancarlo Esposito of Gustavo Fring fame, had minimal roles which would not have been missed. Opposite to Okja have been Win It All and Shimmer Lake, small independent films with a few substantial stars which shine with fantastic plots and performances. Both of these films have been starved of attention from critics and Netflix alike, but overshadow Okja with their ingenuity and realism.

The current situation with on-demand screening of films is exactly the same as how Nolan depicts the horror in the 1990’s of your film winding up with a direct to video release. Deprived of the fanfare of a theatrical release, a film would be at the mercy of luck to find an audience strong enough to champion that film until it became a success. Direct to video and on-demand release have the veneer of choice and accessibility, but viewers will not choose a film which they have heard nothing about, especially as a non theatrical release remains a sign of poor quality.

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The strongest example of on-demand screening’s shortfalls are independent films like Buster’s Mal Heart. Shining with originality and starring Raimi Malek, Buster’s Mal Heart seemed filled with the soul wrenching eeriness of a Cormac McCarthy novel. I had been anticipating the film for months until I recently checked for screenings and found none. Buster’s Mal Heart received a brief, flickering presence on U.K. cinema screens before disappearing onto the internet. I am hoping to watch the film through You Tube Movies this week and a review will be linked here. While the internet seems to provide salvation to the overlooked and underappreciated films out there, I am someone who loves cinema and will seek out films that interest me. I am an exception amid the general audience. Unless a film is placed on the big screen either at the local art house cinema or multiplex, most people will not look for them. Even my local art house cinema in Manchester has reduced the availability of independent films in favour of commercial blockbusters. Song to Song, a Terence Malick film, only received a week slot before being removed. I do not know why cinemas both big and small, seem to be showing fewer films for less time. Part of me believes its a rationalisation that if the audience misses one film, they can catch it online.

Art needs to be championed, it needs to be given attention and granted the venue where it can best appreciated. Cinemas are and will continue to be the exhibition halls of film. While online streaming  has a place in film, it would rob the art of its vibrancy if it supplanted cinemas outright.

By Saul Shimmin