Tag Archives: Marvel

Spider-Man Homecoming

Movie Score4 out of 5 (Excellent)

Cast: Tom Holland, Michael Keaton, Robert Downey Jr., Marisa Tomei, Jon Favreau, Donald Glover, Zendaya, Jacob Batalon, Hannibal Buress, Laura Harrier, & Tony Revolori

Director: Jon Watts

Synopsis: The mutated spider has already bit Peter Parker and transformed him into Spider-Man. The movie commences a few months after Spidey disarmed Captain America. While technically part of the Avengers, Peter has to remain in Queens, fighting petty criminals because Tony Stark’s (Robert Downey Jr.) commanded him to lay low and be “a friendly, neighborhood Spider-Man.”  Frustrated with such limitations, Peter sets off to fight “serious crime” in order to prove his worth as an Avenger to Tony and his assistant, Happy Hogan (Jon Favreau). On this quest, Peter discovers Adrian Toomes/The Vulture/Birdman (Michael Keaton), a former construction contractor, who is now scavenging and selling alien weaponry from The Avengers invasion on the black market. After seeing the destruction such weapons are capable of, Peter sets out to defeat The Vulture whilst balancing a normal high school life. A great movie ensues.

Heading into the movie, I felt disappointed. A week early, I had read a review that stated Spider-Man Homecoming was purely a franchise building machine with only small moments of humor and few redeeming qualities. Ladies and gentlemen, friends, families, and readers, let me be the first and hopefully not the last to tell you the aforementioned review was wrong.

The movie’s teenage characters were my favorite part (besides the villain Toomes). Tom Holland phenomenally portrayed Peter Parker. I’m so glad he did not try to emulate Toby Maguire’s sniveling, wimpy version of Peter. Instead, Holland imbues Peter with humorous and nerdy, yet subtly cool, qualities. Together with Jacob Batalon’s hilarious character, Ned, the two form a wonderful duo who made me laugh a lot more than I expected. Normally, six screenwriters on one film signals trouble, but in this one the writers created and gave Ned and Peter some fantastic quips. However, they didn’t hoard all the best lines for the main characters. Zendaya’s hipster Michelle several great lines. I wish they had also decided to make Michelle a more prominent character since she stole all her scenes.

Like Zendaya, Keaton, of course, killed all his scenes. However, what made me love his character and the movie was not just his quality acting. It was also his character and his motives. Toomes began the movie as just an honest construction worker trying to take advantage of a good business opportunity: governmental contracts to help rebuild a destroyed New York City after the Chitauri army wrecks it in The Avengers. However, after losing the contract when the government discovers the power of the Chitauri weapons and asserts control over the reconstruction. This move leaves Toomes in a precarious position as he took out large loans to gather the men and equipment needed to take on such a job. Therefore, in order to support his family and his men’s families, he starts finding, fixing, and selling the alien weaponry on the black market.

I enjoyed Toomes because he was not a master villain trying to take over the world à la Loki. Instead, he was just a man doing whatever it takes to make ends meet and live the American dream. In an interesting conversation with Peter, Toomes asks him, what’s the difference between what he does and Tony Stark selling arms to the armies of the world. Such a question enters a fantastic grey area that Marvel likes to venture into and have successfully done so far like in The Winter Soldier and Civil War.  The question stumps Peter and it stumped me.

Target Audience: Teenagers, Marvel/DC/Disney lovers, and middle age adults. I’m counting out people over 50 based on my dad’s groans when he saw the trailer and children because the Vulture can, at times, be fearsome.

For trailer, see below.

By Hagood Grantham

Deadpool 2 (2018) – Teaser

Outlook: Insanely great

Director: David Leitch

Cast: Ryan Reynolds, Maria Baccarin, & David Harbour

20th Century Fox smartly placed this teaser in between Logan‘s trailers and the starting scene of Logan with no MPAA green splash screen. Without the screen, its start appeared to be the opening scene of Logan, so when Wade Wilson removes his hood, its a total surprise. I fell over in my seat laughing from the shock. The teaser epitomizes what Deadpool stands for: subverting the superhero genre through ruthless mocking. This trailer specifically mocks Superman, Spiderman, Stan Lee cameos, and of course, Wolverine. The trailer continues Deadpool‘s  awesomely crude humor with my favorite line being- “Zip it, Stan Lee!”

Things to note:

  1. On the phone booth someone has written “Nathan Summers cumming soon.” According to Wikipedia, Nathan Summers is an antagonist in the X-Men universe and his superhero name is Cable. I don’t know much about comic lore as I’ve never read one, but go to Wikipedia to learn more.
  2. The Firefly posters in the window behind the phone-booth. I’m sure this is a nod to Morena Baccarin’s most famous role besides her role as Wade’s girlfriend, Vanessa.
  3. The Deadpool Cliff Notes version of The Old Man and the Sea. In it Wade humorously harps on the similarities between the Old Man’s bad luck with the fish and his bad luck with Vanessa in Deadpool. Parts of it also sound like Donald Trump’s tweets. I’m not sure the connection there, but it is definitely worth a read.

Deadpool 2 is scheduled to be released sometime in 2018. Can’t come fast enough.

 

Logan 

Movie Score: 5 out 5 (The only classic Marvel film so far)

Director: James Mangold

Cast: Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart, Stephen Merchant, Richard. E. Grant, Boyd Holbrook, and introducing Dafne Keen.

Saul’s Review

Logan stands alone as a classic film from the superhero genre. Remove the abilities, and Logan is a gritty film contending with violence, desperation, hope, and family. Hugh Jackman and Patrick Stewart return to roles that have defined their careers, delivering their best performances as The Wolverine and Professor X. Out of the two, Jackman truly shines,depicting Logan not as a hero in any sort, but as a man crushed by a hostile world, frayed by years of hiding and tainted by a long life of misery. Set in a dystopian premonition of Trump’s America, the superheroes in Logan are not invincible, but vulnerable, and it is their vulnerability which makes them so dangerous. This is the most human superhero film ever made. Nor does the film waiver, like so many blockbuster films, from its own serious tone. Logan unflinchingly shows the consequences and deaths which ensue The Wolverine’s actions.

A great final performance

In Logan, The Wolverine has shifted from being a man with nothing to lose as seen in earlier films, to a man who wants to die. It takes an actor with an understanding and an appreciation of a character, like Hugh Jackman, to successfully affect such a subtle shift. Down to his physicality, The Wolverine is a broken man, shuffling onto the opening scenes, dragging himself against the worries of the world. Although he is older and wearier of violence, The Wolverine’s anger is unbridled once provoked rendering him even deadlier than ever. Director James Mangold, who directed The Wolverine before Logan, understands the character, and is able to present a darker depiction of The Wolverine, injecting enough levity into the plot to stop Logan delving into melodrama.

Professor X is no longer the leader of the X-Men but an ailing and elderly man who has moments of lucidity. Patrick Stewart always fitted the role of Professor X, but in Logan we see two refreshing sides to the character. Professor X alternates between a caring grandfather figure towards the young mutant Laura (Dafne Keen), to a stern and mainly ungrateful father and mentor to The Wolverine. Both Stewart and Jackson had great chemistry together in earlier X-Men films, but Logan’s focus upon the pair adds to the close relationship these characters have, and how ultimately, they need each other.

Dafne Keen, without revealing too much about her character, is the mirror to The Wolverine. Her youth and rage matches The Wolverine’s weariness and age. While watching her character, she repeats many of the mannerisms, and flaws, of a younger Wolverine, and clearly needs his help to accept who she is.

Despite William Boyd, of Narcos fame, delivering a great turn as head villain Donald Pierce, lacing his role with humour and a clear admiration for mutants, it is Stephen Merchant who surprises as mutant Caliban. Merchant’s performance was refreshingly serious, with his comedic quips only adding to a character who I became quickly attached to. I hope Merchant receives more serious roles as a result of Logan, he definitely has the talent to succeed.

Weird West

Logan is a hybrid of dystopian and Western themes which draws from Rian Johnson’s Looper’s setting and themes of family, love and redemption. It is a credit to Mangold and screenwriter Scott Frank that Logan steps onto well used tropes, but remains unique. By straddling the America-Mexico border, the film subtly comments upon temporary America, juxtaposing the desolate but peaceful Mexico borderlands with the aggressive patriotism and debauchery of El Paso, Texas.

Broad landscape panoramas of Mexican plans cut against well scripted fight scenes that flit between steady cam and fixed camera shots. The car chases scenes take inspiration from Mad Max: Fury Road, delivering moments which appear like a choreographed dance. Pitting The Wolverine and Professor X against The Reavers, mechanically enhanced mercenaries, evens the odds. Every encounter with The Reavers is a hard-won fight, as opposed to earlier X-Men films where it was all too obvious which side would succeed.

Verdict

Not since Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight has a superhero film felt as grounded in realism, where actions have a cost and the characters are not fantastical, but people trying to better the world, however bleak. If you have the time, go see Logan.

Recommended audience: Comic-book lovers, Marvel Fans and anyone who does not want to see a typical blockbuster film.

Hagood’s review:

I couldn’t think of a better send off for my favorite member of the X-Men. This “final” Wolverine film surpassed Superhero clichés in the best way: intense drama. Deadpool & Guardians of the Galaxy both circumvented such clichés, but did so by mocking or over-exaggerating them. After a string of decent Wolverine movies (X-Men Origins: Wolverine & The Wolverine), Logan does more than deliver breathtaking action. It brings intense emotion fueled by complex characters.

The movie starts with a weakened and aged Logan dedicatedly nursing the sick Professor X south of the Mexican border. Neither he nor Professor X have a true purpose in life. Both struggle in their day-to-day lives, but then enters the young and tumultuous mutant, Laura (the debut role of the superb Dafne Keen), who is being hunted by mercenary Donald Pierce (played by rising star, Boyd Holbrook).

Suddenly, these two aging mutants have a purpose to live: Protect the last child of their race.

But the plot goes deeper than “racial” eugenics. It boils down to the fiercest bonds humans share: Family. This is where Logan bests its Marvel and DC brethren. Most gloss over such important bonding elements and instead focus on delivering a massive third-act battle royale, which can be fun, but quickly becomes boring. Logan does both: it packs in several concentrated and extreme battles, but it doesn’t withhold the quiet moments where characters connect.

My only gripe with Logan is that at 2 hours and 17 minutes, it is a bit long. Honestly, I cannot recommend a scene to shorten or cut, so maybe it doesn’t need a cut.

Please, go enjoy this pleasantly deep Marvel film.

Target audience: Teenage males (for the bloody action) and serious movie aficionados

For the trailer follow the link 

Super Bowl Trailers

THE BAD

Transformers: The Last Knight

The size of the paycheck Michael Bay sent to Hopkin’s agent in order to get him on Transformers: The Last Knight will be this film’s biggest reveal.

Potential sequel, if Hopkins stays on board, could be Silence of the Transformers: More Bayhem.

Pirates of the Caribbean 5: Dead Men Tell No Tales

Shiver me franchises, Disney is at it again (Pirates will be there 2nd of 5 sequels for 2017).

However, it does seem that this Pirates film may have a slightly darker tone.

With Orlando Bloom back, can Disney find Box Office treasure again?

Furious 7

Next sequel: Furious 8, Vin Diesel packs it in, gets a Prius, and dabbles in microbreweries along the East Coast.

THE GOOD

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

I eagerly anticipate the return of Marvel’s best franchise so far, but this trailer did need a little more Groot.

Baywatch

Biggie, slow-motion, and some pretty funny jokes at Zac Efron’s expense, we’ll hold out hope.

Logan

Logan could be the pinnacle of the X-Men series so far, striking overtones that are reminiscent of The Road,  but hopefully without the whiff of cannibalism.

Logan (2017) – Teaser

Logan opens on March 3, 2017. This movie is supposedly Hugh Jackman’s last time portraying Logan a.k.a. Wolverine. It is a role Mr. Jackman has held for the past 17 years. Marvel Entertainment, TSG Entertainment, and the Donners’ Company are producing it with 20th Century Fox handling distribution.

Honestly, Logan‘s second trailer let me down. Its first trailer was much more enthralling, sucking me in with the opening chords of Johnny Cash’s power ballad, “Hurt.” The trailer had minimal dialogue and consisted of stunning, western landscapes reminiscent of my recent favorites Sicario and Hell or High Water. The added electronic buildup to “Hurt’s” climax made my heart-rate jump up a 100 BPM. Most importantly, I felt it gave me enough of the plot to be intrigued, but not enough to spoil any major plot points.

While this trailer contained impressive violence, I felt that the snippets the trailer reveals of the girl’s power diminished her overall aura and mystery. Admittedly, I enjoyed seeing her fighting skills, however this trailer lacked the emotion and grip of the first trailer and left me feeling more disheartened than energized about Logan.

Additionally, I did some research about the film and discovered that shooting only began in May of 2016 and wrapped in early August. Three months is about normal for principal photography, but I hope its early spring release won’t hinder its post-production because a movie of this stature needs excellent special effects. Maybe studios spoil us now  with insane post-production schedules and budgets like Star Wars: Episode VIII‘s, which ended its principal photography in July, just one month before Logan. However, Disney won’t release it till December of this year, which means it’ll have 8 months more post-production time than Logan.

One good bit of news is that Stephen Merchant is starring in Logan. This was previously unbeknownst to me and I’m excited to see how the gangly-ginger-goon fits in.

**Quick aside: didn’t Professor X die in X-Men: The Last Stand? Marvel & Fox need to get their timelines straight.

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

Remember those secret Death Star plans R2 carried throughout the original Star WarsRogue One: A Star Wars Story is about the Rebels who stole them from the Empire during the darkest of times when the Empire was at its mightiest. The plot sets off with the Rebel Alliance rescuing  Jyn Erso, portrayed by the beautiful and talented Felicity Jones, from an Empire work prison to help contact her father, Galen Erso, played by veteran actor Mads Mikkelsen. Galen is one of the architects who designed the Death Star. The plot rockets away from this moment merrily easing to lightspeed as the movie progresses. Rogue One is directed by Gareth Edwards and was written by Chris Weitz and Tony Gilroy.

Film Score: 4.5 out of 5 (nigh perfect)

Hagood’s Review (Spoilers ahead)

Thanks to Rogue One I now (happily) have a new order to my favorite Star Wars movies: The Empire Strikes Back, Star Wars, Rogue OneThe Force AwakensReturn of the JediRevenge of the SithClones, Phantom. I found few things wrong with it and a galaxy and a half that I like about it.

I’ll start with my criticisms: not enough character development, especially with Chirrut Îmwe and Baze Malbus. I loved them and hurt when they died, but a few minutes more about their backstory would’ve been welcome so the audience could learn why they were kyber crystal guardians and how they came to know one another. Same goes for Cassian and his wonderful sidekick, K-2SO (Alan Tudyk). Also, more screen time for the Imperial defector, Bodhi Rook (Riz Ahmed). Why did he defect? How close was he with Galen? How did he escape his post? I realize Mr. Edwards, Mr. Weitz, and Mr. Gilroy had to efficiently tell this story and they did a fantastic job of pacing Rogue‘s plot. I’m just being greedy here and wanting another layer to this rich movie.

To discuss my the parts I enjoyed, I’d like to begin by responding to Joe Morgenstern’s review of the movie in The Wall Street Journal. Mr. Morgenstern harshly criticized Rogue One stating that the movie’s connections to A New Hope and Revenge of the Sith and its “epic echoes are just about all this production has going for it.” He also called the movie’s action “chaotic” and believed the plot and its characters are all too dour. His critiques are all unfounded. The references to the other movies and Rogue‘s cameos were fun Easter eggs, not its basis. The movie’s character’s, plot, and action all stood on their own. If the Rebels were stealing plans to the design of Darth Vader’s Bacta tank in his Mustafar lair instead of the plans to the Death Star, I would’ve been just as intrigued and entertained. The build up to the movie’s climax and its climax were all well written and executed. Also, Mr. Edwards purposefully harried its action. The Rebels designed their attack to distract the Empire’s security and buy Cassian & Jyn time, not to make a sensical, thought-out attack, and their stern expressions and attitudes were a reflection of their lives under the cruel rule of the galactic Empire. As Cassian told Jyn, he’d been fighting for the Alliance since he was six and he’d done terrible things for the Cause. Jyn had been fending for herself with the crazed Saw since roughly the same age. What does Mr. Morgernstern expect of Jyn and Cassian? A god awful scene of frolicking shenanigans like Anakin and Padme on that field on Naboo? Mr. Edward’s tone for the film was right. It’s a war movie with intense sacrifices. Rogue‘s grimness was a welcome change, especially after Finn’s stupid, way-too-modern humor in The Force Awakens. In fact, the no-man-left-alive was one of my favorite facets about the movie. It revealed Disney is still open to taking risks and not making the family-friendly movie people have come to expect of the company with their live-action remakes and comedic and upbeat Marvel characters. I hope Rian Johnson takes Episode VIII in the same direction.

Please, go see this movie. It’s well worth your time if you are above the age of 10.

Recommended Audience: anyone above the age of ten (if you didn’t read the review, its a darker movie than most Star Wars movies).

Saul’s Review (Spoilers too)

I am glad to add Rogue One to Green Room and Paterson as the few exceptions to a disappointing year for Cinema.

Rogue One is the ideal movie for Star Wars fans who loathed the prequels, but found The Force Awakens to be a little underwhelming.

My expectations for Rogue One were fairly low when I bought my ticket. Following the rushed job that Disney had done slotting Doctor Strange into the Marvel Universe. I was worried that Rogue One would simply be a cash-in to tide audiences over until Episode VIII. Felicity Jones, who portrays Rogue One protagonist Jyn Erso, also starred last year in Inferno where Jones’s character and acting stood out as poor. Despite all this, Rogue One is the only major blockbuster I have seen this year that did not disappoint.

Whether by design or coincidence, Rogue One is reminiscent of La Bataille D’Alger, the 1966 film about the Algerian War of Independence from France. The rebels, just like the Algerian freedom fighters, are fighting a superior enemy and take extreme measures to survive. Edwards depicts the Rebellion as a clandestine organisation, willing to kill civilians and its own members if they stray too far. The Empire equalled the rebels with its own infighting, operating like an old European royal court with high ranking officers clambering over one another to seek the Emperor’s ear. During the immediate viewing of the film, I was swept away by Rogue One’s plot. Since then, what has impressed me the most was how the Empire and the Rebellion both internally mirrored and differed from each other.

The rebels constantly felt at a disadvantage throughout Rogue One due to the excellent battle sequences. In every skirmish, the Empire had a clear superiority, with the Rebels clutching at guerrilla tactics and improvisation to stave the Empire off.

Rogue One’s enthusiasm to present the Rebellion in a darker light through Captain Cassian quickly peters out once he is alongside Jyn, with no real explanation why. This is Rogue One‘s sole failing but with such a great plot and cast, it is quickly forgotten.

Finally I remember being terrified of Darth Vader as a child, fast forwarding my VHS tape of A New Hope whenever he appeared. The final scene where Vader storms through the Rebel ship, massacring all within the gloomy corridor, gave me the same sense of dread. I hope Disney makes a Vader spin-off too.

Recommended audience: Die-hard Star Wars fans and anyone who wants to watch a decent blockbuster.

For the trailer see below:

 

Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017) – Teaser

Spider-Man : Homecoming is the reboot of Spider-Man following the replacement of Andrew Garfield by Tom Holland as the titular character. The film is directed by Jon Watts, whose previous work includes the thriller Cop Car starring Kevin Bacon.

Saul’s Thoughts:

I have yet to see Cop Car, but the film’s trailer showed a brooding figure that recycled many parts of the classic 1995 film Night of the Hunter, where two children are plunged into the adult world, hunted by a monster posing as an authority figure.

Homecoming’s trailer does follow the more light hearted approach of Guardians of the Galaxy and Doctor Strange. Although  Holland may only be known through Cop Car, he does have experience in comedy, having directed episodes of satirical show The Onion News Network  in 2011.

I do have my concerns with Spider-Man: Homecoming following Doctor Strange, where Disney slotted a lesser known character into the Avengers-Marvel ensemble. The character of Spider-Man has far more clout in pop culture than Doctor Strange, due to the Spider-Man cartoons and the Spider-Man films by Sam Raimi in the 2000’s. The biggest issue with Doctor Strange was that the film pursued both comedy and serious drama in an origin story. The combination of the three elements shaped Doctor Strange into a rushed introduction of a character on Disney-Marvel’s course to greater and bigger films.

Spider-Man: Homecoming may suffer from the same issues as Doctor Strange in that both characters arrived late to The Avengers film group. Plus Spider-Man and Doctor Strange have not received the slower pace of a Netflix series. Therefore they have to quickly catch up with the wide audience appeal of more established Avengers characters such as Iron Man or Captain America. Doctor Strange did feel like a rushed attempt as mentioned above, and Spider Man: Homecoming may share this flaw.

The replacement of Andrew Garfield by the younger Holland for the Spider-Man reboot, alongside the injection of ‘Homecoming’ into the title, is a ploy to grab audiences in middle-school and below.

The Homecoming teaser trailer supports my theory about Disney’s current strategy towards the film market. Disney appears to be dividing  Star Wars and Marvel into two streams, with the first stream adopting a gritty tone,  counterbalanced by a second stream of action films designed for families and children.

Captain America: Civil War is far more brooding in comparison to the earlier Captain America: The First Avenger and Captain America: The Winter Soldier. On the other hand, Guardians of the Guardians of the Galaxy reels in the laughs and is being followed by a sequel and Doctor Strange, which was funny in parts. Star Wars: The Force Awakens last year was a rehash of A New Hope for a newer and younger audience.

It is not coincidental that Rogue One is arriving between The Force Awakens and Star Wars Episode 8. Trailers for Rogue One infer a darker tone than The Force Awakens. While the protagonists of the main Star Wars series so far are teenagers trapped on backwaters who dream of adventure, Jyn Erso, the lead of Rogue One is a criminal on the fringes of the galaxy. Her criminal record is gleefully announced at the beginning of the Rogue One trailer, stressing how different and mature this spin off will be.

If Disney’s strategy is to partition Marvel and Star Wars between older and younger audiences through films ranging in maturity of content, then I think that is clever. The strategy does risk a potential overlap where both strands try to entertain different audiences with distinct tastes depending on age, but the films end up not satisfying both.

Disney could succeed, but there must be consistency, particularly with the films designed for older audiences . The Dark Knight series was about a superhero that attained critical and commercial success, while containing darker themes such as the human condition, nihilism and redemption. Disney just needs to take a risk and really step outside its comfort zone of entertaining children, teenagers and families. Otherwise, the I.P conveyer belt will become lacklustre.

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017) – Teaser

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 starring Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Vin Diesel, Bradley Cooper, Dave Bautista, Kurt Russell, & Sylvester Stallone. Written and directed by James Gunn.

Hagood’s thoughts:

Who didn’t love Baby Groot dancing at the end of Guardians Vol. 1? Well, Marvel heard the love and will now provide us with over two hours of Groot cuteness. Beyond that exciting factor, this trailer (thankfully) reveals little about the movie’s plot beyond a few comic moments like atomic-bomb-toting Baby Groot’s simple mind.

I am quite excited for this movie, especially learning how Kurt Russell and Sylvester Stallone fit into Marvel’s light(er)-hearted, space-Avenger-esque squad. Enjoy the trailer and feel free to leave your thoughts below in the comments.

Doctor Strange: Change the meds

Film Score: 2 out of 5 (Below Average)

In this new Disney-Marvel Expansion, prominent surgeon Doctor Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) is struck by tragedy, leading a to a mystical journey from surgeon to ‘heroic’ magician. That journey felt like a 4 a.m. taxi ride on a Saturday night after one kebab too many.

Doctor Strange is part of Disney’s inevitable expansion of the Marvel Universe as it leads up to the Infinity War. The film feels like a rushed attempt to cash-in on acquired I.P., rather than a holistic introduction to a character unknown to many viewers unless they are Marvel readers.

I have no bias against Disney’s Marvel expansion, some of the Disney-Marvel films were great, particularly Guardians of the Galaxy. Having watched the Doctor Strange trailer, and seen the actors involved, my expectation was that Doctor Strange would mirror the wackiness and humour of Guardians of the Galaxy.

Doctor Strange’s persistent flaw is the aggressive urgency by which the plot develops. The film feels like a check-list of events, exposition and emotions which have been rushed through in competition with a deadline.

The most obvious example of Doctor Strange’s ridiculous pace is the romance element between title character Doctor Steven Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) and colleague Christine Palmer (Rachel McAdams).  It is clear from the first hospital scene that the pair have been romantically involved at some point, yet little reason is given to why the relationship failed. Following the film’s introduction, their romance seems to reappear and disappear at a whim, until Strange seemingly forgoes Christine to fight the villain Kaecilius (Mads Mikklesen).

The film is so eager to conclude the story that it veers between serious drama and slapstick humour, pushing the viewer between emotions and leaving them confused as to what they should feel at any given time. The scene where Doctor Strange is introduced to magic is the worst affected by the film’s rushed feel. Strange’s reality is shattered and I should have shared his sense of being overwhelmed by this new world. I spent the 2 minutes of that scene laughing out loud, to my realisation that I was one of the few laughing in the audience. This excessive alteration between comedy and drama blots out the genuine moments in the film, tinging Doctor Strange with a sense of melodrama.

The main cast are seasoned actors, particularly Mads Mikklesen (Kaecilius) who has been one of my favourite actors since watching The Hunt. The acting is great throughout but once again the plot weakens the film. Character development is very limited. Characters appear on cue, but no time is afforded to develop any emotional bond between them and the audience. When the film concluded, I had the same sense of investment in what had unfolded as when I half-heartedly watch a Sunday T.V show with my parents.

There were opportunities to develop the film’s characters further, some of the character’s past history and motivations are stated but not expanded upon. These omissions stem from what appears to be a lack of time. Doctor Strange is the character that lacks the most development, he comes across as a jerk who is too clever for his own good, refusing to accept any of the lessons afforded to him during his journey from surgeon to mage. The end attempts to show that Doctor Strange has become a hero, but it was missing a good twenty minutes showing the protagonist’s actual transition.

It is probable that the next cinematic appearance by the good Doctor Strange will humble him and expand on his past. However, Doctor Strange would have been better suited to the generous runtime of a Netflix series, allowing characters and the story to grow naturally.

Despite watching Doctor Strange in 2D the film’s special effects were impressive, but that is to be expected from a company with Disney’s financial stature.

The franchise awakens

Doctor Strange raises concerns for Disney’s second and far more recent I.P. acquisition, Star Wars.

I am a fan of the original films and I did enjoy The Force Awakens, although I did not dress up for my local premiere in Star Wars garb like the middle aged father, and his two embarrassed daughters, sitting next to me.  The next films in the Star Wars franchise are Rogue One and the Han Solo’s origins story.

The upcoming Star Wars spin-offs boast robust casts but I have my doubts. Rogue One is essentially a story with an ending that is already known to fans of the series. Moreover Han Solo is the fan favourite of the original films and will definitely reap a profit. I fear that for Star Wars, in comparison to how Marvel is faring under Disney, that the franchise is going to be exactly that, a franchise. Instead of Star Wars being a film series which at certain levels deals with matters such as morality and spirituality, it is going to become a conveyor belt of ever minor characters to a point of saturation.

In  Disney’s defence they are a major company and they need to maintain profit growth for shareholders. Yet I was hoping with Disney’s acquisition of the Star Wars title, that there would be spin-offs exploring deeper issues for the older Star Wars audience which has grown up with the original films and the prequels from the late 1970’s to the 2000’s. A potential subject for a more mature Star Wars film would be the fact that Republic’s Clone Army is a force of slaves. A film exploring this issue could cover many issues within our reality in a sci-fi setting, such as the loss of identity in warfare, freedom and destiny, and so forth.

When I left the screening of Doctor Strange, I did have a sense that Disney was basically selling the family silver, rather than taking risks. I hope that my opinion will be soon disproved.

Target audience: Younger teens and children.

By Saul Shimmin

For the trailer, see below: