Tag Archives: Alien

Alien: Covenant

Movie Score: 4 out of 5 stars

Cast: Katherine Waterston, Danny McBride, Billy Crudup, Michael Fassbender

Director: Ridley Scott

Synopsis: The Covenant and its crew are carrying 2,000 colonists towards a new life deep into unknown space. Just like the original Alien, the crew stumble across a distress signal from an unexplored planet. The covenant follows the signal and horror ensues.

Halfway through Alien: Covenant one of the characters declares that ‘if one note is off, the whole symphony fails’. His words are prophetic for the film itself.

Alien: Covenant is an enjoyable film with scares equalling the terrifying Alien.  Unfortunately, Alien: Covenant shares the same problems as Prometheus. It self-proclaims its own profoundness and complexity but buckles under this ambition, resulting in occasionally poor dialogue and plot omissions. Only Scott’s renewed focus upon the monsters distracts you from Covenant’s flaws until the film ends.

The film evades any of the questions raised by Prometheus, concluding without any finality to the Alien arc. The cliff hanger ending was well-delivered, but exposes the whole film to be mere kindling for another sequel. Nor does Alien: Covenant provide an explanation of past events for new viewers.  I found the film engrossing, but Alien: Covenant will confuse the uninitiated, and disappoint fans expecting answers to Prometheus.

Alien: Covenant does have many merits. Scott has repeated the pragmatically futuristic design from Alien, coupled with CGI, to create a grounded and believable world. Alien: Covenant is genuinely terrifying, with Scott returning to the slasher-esque feel of the original as the crew scramble to fight or flee from the monsters. The monsters themselves do fall flat  in earlier scenes where they are clearly computer generated, but their menace grows, especially when they appear in glimmers before snatching their prey.

Scott, when interviewed in a Q and A about Alien, said that if you cast properly for a film you have done half of the work. For Alien: Covenant, Scott stuck to his maxim. The cast is a solid roster who convincingly portray the Covenant’s crew. Danny McBride (Tennessee) and Katherine Waterston (Daniels) stand out from the cast. In the past Waterston has stuck to roles portraying damsels in distress. At Alien: Covenant’s beginning, it seemed that Waterston would repeat that role, but she transforms into the pragmatic leader of the survivors. Danny McBride, known for comedic roles, suits the slightly more serious character in Alien: Covenant. It would be great to see him in similar roles soon.

One of the best aspects of the film is the power play within the Covenant’s crew. Certain characters, as tragedies unfold, either break or harden, letting us witness a power shift between the crew from Alien: Covenant’s beginning to end.

Michael Fassbender, as identical androids David and Walter, delivers a great performance once more. Both characters are mirror opposites of each other, developing a twisted father-son relationship, repeating David’s own relationship with Peter Weyland, the androids’ creator.

Other characters may seem underdeveloped, but Alien: Covenant is a monster film, with a vast cast to boot. Given the circumstances, it would be difficult for many of the characters to be well-developed before they die off. However, the lack of expostion for David causes his surrounding air of mystery to dwindle, transforming him into a vaudeville villain.

David’s character underlines what might be the central flaw of Alien: Covenant and Prometheus. Both films require a near complete focus and prior viewing of Scott’s earlier sci-fi films, to understand and appreciate their stories and themes. Personally, Prometheus and Alien: Covenant, through their focus on artificial intelligence and conflicts between the creator and the created, are spiritual successors to Blade Runner.

For the every-man, Alien: Covenant will likely disappoint and confuse as much as it may entertain.

By Saul Shimmin

For the trailer, see below:

 

Alien Covenant- Teaser

Outlook- Promising, but there are doubts

Director: Ridley Scott

Cast: Katherine Waterston, James Franco, Danny McBride, Michael Fassbender, Billy Crudup and others.

Prometheus was the first draft of a film, rather than the complete tale. It tried to explain the background to Alien, while exploring the premise of human life as an accident, devoid of intelligent design. The film was ambitious but relied on inferences and assumptions to cover up gaping holes in the story. To audiences who had not seen Alien or who were not fans of Scott’s work, Prometheus was incoherent. Ridley Scott is a talented director who can muster another  masterpiece equalling his earlier films. Following the teaser trailer which came out a few months ago, Alien: Covenant will be another classic film crafted by Scott’s hands.

20th Century Fox has just released the official trailer for  Alien: Covenant. Visually, the film is a gorgeous blend of CGI, practical effects, set-pieces, and on-location filming. The cut between the Covenant gliding across the stars to their landing on their new home was breathtaking. The trailer follows the transition of a great horror film, from cautious optimism to increasing terror. Scott has perfected the ambience for this film.

Alien: Covenant boasts a great cast overall, and their respective characters have been developed through the ominously titled The Last Supper prologue for Alien: Covenant. The scene itself presents the traits of the main characters very effectively through snippets of dialogue, and imparts a real sense of comradeship, excitement, and trepidation as the Covenant’s crew embarks on the landmark colonisation of a distant planet.

I would recommend watching The Last Supper prologue before watching the Alien: Covenant trailer.

 

While watching the full Alien: Covenant trailer, I occasionally noticed the same incoherence that afflicted Prometheus. The trailer reveals multiple threats to the Covenant’s crew, a hooded-figure, an airborne virus, and strangely enough two different types of alien. The alien in the later scenes of the trailer is the classic xenomorph we know and love, but halfway through, one of the covenant’s crew is gored by an anaemic and wiry variant. Hopefully Scott has returned to Alien’s template of a monster film in space, instead of building an overly complicated plot like Prometheus.

I still have issues with Katherine Waterston as the lead character, Daniels. Alien and Prometheus centred upon a strong female lead, and so far I have only seen Katherine Waterston playing helpless and unsympathetic characters. Scott has stated that casting is the pivotal part of his film-making process, but Waterston still comes across as wet, which disappoints me because in Inherent Vice, she tantalised us with glimpses of potential.

Having watched the trailer a few times, here are a few things I have noticed so far:

1.36: The dog-tag in the Alien ship definitely belongs to Elizabeth Shaw, the sole human survivor of Prometheus, as the Weyland corporation logo is present.

1.56: The hooded figure, seen in the teaser trailer and who does not belong to the Covenant crew, heads towards an engineer settlement, surrounded by dead xenomorphs and maybe even dead engineers. From the number of bodies which fill this large landscape shot, it looks the engineers made one last stand against the xenomorphs.

If you are a fan of Ridley Scott’s work, check out our 4th wall post, Ridley Scott and the value of life: part one . This is the first piece in a miniseries exploring Alien, Blade Runner and Prometheus.

Let us know if you spot any more secrets in the new trailer!

By Saul Shimmin

For the trailer, see below:

Ridley Scott and the value of life: part one

Alert: Spoilers below for Alien, Blade Runner and Prometheus

Science-fiction is a genre which invites writers and directors to explore deeper topics and philosophical questions. No other director working today has better used Sci-fi for this purpose than Ridley Scott, renowned for AlienBlade Runner, and Prometheus. 

We see the human race as the world’s axis.  Our species continues to grow and consume at an unsustainable pace, placing our demands above all other forms of planetary life. Western religion claims that we are the pinnacle of creation, moulded in the image of God. Outside the West, other philosophies and religions share the belief that humanity alone has been imbued with a soul, placing us apart from the rest of creation.

AlienBlade Runner, and Prometheus are each a different premise where Scott questions our beliefs, and our hypocrisies about the value of human life.

Alien and ‘intelligent life’ 

Around 400 years ago, people still believed the solar system revolved around the Earth. Humanity has moved on since then, but we still perceive the universe from a self-centered perspective.

Today the world balances on the axis of humanity, and the universe revolves around our pull. In popular culture our forays into space commonly belong to three types: conflict, contact or isolation. In film, typically, humanity is found by another species with a familiar system of civilization and technology to our own. The arriving species may invade our planet, or guide us, or we attack them. The final two types are contact and isolation. Humanity comes into contact with something incomprehensible like the monolith from 2001: A Space Odyssey or we wander the galaxy, completely alone.

Few have depicted a universe where humanity is inconsequential, even unnoticed. These works belong to Cosmic Horror, a genre formed by H.P. Lovecraft. Cosmic Horror topples the assumption we have held, from biblical times and beyond, that we have some measure of control on the world. Western thought has developed the idea that we were designed for a purpose, that we can master everything both tangible and intangible. Plato’s The Republic is the earliest work I know that claims we will eventually understand everything, becoming gods in our own right. Plato’s concept of the Philosopher-King, just like Nietschze’s Ubermensche, shares the belief that humanity’s pre-destined superiority over the world, and the universe, will arise.

Cosmic Horror challenges humanity’s sense of purpose and superiority. Across Lovercraft’s works, in the Universe beyond our understanding, characters come across forces far more powerful than ourselves. Humanity’s divine trajectory to masters of the universe is shattered, our species is shown to be at the whim of random, and often chaotic forces beyond our grasp.

Alien and Prometheus both draw from Cosmic Horror, although in different ways. Prometheus upends the Christian belief that humans were purposefully created. Instead humanity, just like Frankenstein’s monster, is the product of an experiment gone awry, feared by our creator, who is bent upon destroying us. While Prometheus challenges humanity’s purpose, Alien questions our superiority.

Alien exists in a future where space, the last frontier, has become tamer than a front lawn. The crew of the Nostromo are not daring adventurers, but space truckers who want to get home and get paid. The Nostromo’s crew stumble upon a life form that is the polar opposite of human beings. It makes no attempts to understand the crew, the alien is designed to kill and is driven to survive, at the cost of all other life. 

The alien is not a monster, but the first intelligent life this universe has come across. The most chilling scene in the film is when the android Ash, gurgling from his detached head, admires the alien as superior to humans. To Ash, the alien is not a monster, but the ‘perfect organism… designed to survive… unclouded by delusions by remorse… or delusions of morality.’

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrf0cH4o_g4

Ash’s final words reveal the true horror of Alien. A being emerges from the depths of space, shattering the belief in our own dominance in the universe. Despite our technology and brainpower, the lifeform butchers the Nostromo’s crew in a few hours. By the end of Alien, humanity is no longer the masters of space, but weaklings in a universe where darker beings, just like the Alien, may be lurking on forgotten planets. Space no longer tanatalises us with the chance of discovery and progress. The optimism we held for space in the 1960’s has been replaced, with a dread of what lies beyond our planet.

The alien is, like Ash states, intelligent life. If a being like an Alien did exist, it would challenge what we consider to be intelligent alien life. It does not have our intelligence, or social structures, but it lives and strives to survive above all else. How would we value such a being, and more importantly, how would we deal with it?

By Saul Shimmin

 

 

Alien Covenant (2017) – Teaser

Outlook: Promising 

My apologies for not reviewing Alien Covenant’s trailer sooner. The trailer, like the series’ titular monster, appeared innocuously over the Christmas break, only to emerge from hiding when it is far too late.

The dictionary defines a covenant as ‘a promise’. The word itself brings forth biblical connotations of both God’s promise to protect the Israelites if they were faithful to him, and God’s promise to Noah to no longer harm human life once the flood subsided.

Ridley Scott’s choice of Alien Covenant instead of Prometheus 2 must have been deliberate, especially as Prometheus is the titular myth where an act of theft creates humanity. Scott’s sci-fi works explore the relationship between creator and created. They challenge the belief that humanity has value over other life because we were purposefully created. In Scott’s Prometheus,  humanity is created by another race, but never clarifies why we were created. It only reveals that our creators decided to destroy us.

Hopefully, Alien Covenant will reveal why the ‘Gods’ from Prometheus created humanity. It would be interesting if the choice of ‘covenant’ does relate back to God’s promise to Noah, to learn why our creators reneged on their attempt to destroy us. Hopefully, Scott will depict humanity as an experiment gone awry that spread like a virus, just like the alien.

The new trailer for Alien Covenant mixes together Prometheus and Alien but adds new elements too. The space crew panic through dimly lit and claustrophobic corridors, just like the crew of the Nostromo. The rejected pleas of one crewmember to be released from a medical room was reminiscent of Ripley’s refusal in Alien to let the scouting team back aboard the Nostromo. The crew encounter both the parasite virus from Prometheus, and the iconic facehugger from Alien. What a great combination.

Fassbender returns from Prometheus, but he is not the same David android. His hair is brown not blone, indicating that he is a newer model. Curiously, the new David android seems to be in a similar room to where Peter Weyland, who financed the Prometheus mission, recorded a message for the Prometheus crew. Covenant ties to Prometheus in less obvious ways. Katherine Waterston’s character finds what is probably Elizabeth Shaw’s dog-tag in a ruined alien spacecraft. The armed and cloaked figure at 1.31 is either Shaw, or the older David model, having somehow crafted a new body.

Danny McBride has been one of my favourite actors since Easbound and Down. I am looking forward to seeing him perform in a more serious film, and go beyond comedic relief. Katherine Waterson will hopefully veer away from the type of helpless damsel she has played in both Inherent Vice and Fantastic beasts and where to find them. Hopefully, working with Ridley Scott has realised Waterson’s potential, which I have witnessed in brief flashes in other films. Fassbender was great as the android in Prometheus. I expect he will deliver another great performance in this role.

I do have some gripes with the amount of plot that the trailer revealed. Especially in terms of Danny McBride’s death by the alien and the infection of one other crewmember by the virus which appeared in Prometheus.

Finally, I would love it if the original David android, has lured the crew in Alien: Covenant to this new planet. David’s motive would be to send the alien to earth, thereby enacting revenge on humanity, which David laments created him for no reason in Prometheus.

By Saul Shimmin

For the trailer, see below: