Logan 

Movie Score: 5 out 5 (The only classic Marvel film so far)

Director: James Mangold

Cast: Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart, Stephen Merchant, Richard. E. Grant, Boyd Holbrook, and introducing Dafne Keen.

Saul’s Review

Logan stands alone as a classic film from the superhero genre. Remove the abilities, and Logan is a gritty film contending with violence, desperation, hope, and family. Hugh Jackman and Patrick Stewart return to roles that have defined their careers, delivering their best performances as The Wolverine and Professor X. Out of the two, Jackman truly shines,depicting Logan not as a hero in any sort, but as a man crushed by a hostile world, frayed by years of hiding and tainted by a long life of misery. Set in a dystopian premonition of Trump’s America, the superheroes in Logan are not invincible, but vulnerable, and it is their vulnerability which makes them so dangerous. This is the most human superhero film ever made. Nor does the film waiver, like so many blockbuster films, from its own serious tone. Logan unflinchingly shows the consequences and deaths which ensue The Wolverine’s actions.

A great final performance

In Logan, The Wolverine has shifted from being a man with nothing to lose as seen in earlier films, to a man who wants to die. It takes an actor with an understanding and an appreciation of a character, like Hugh Jackman, to successfully affect such a subtle shift. Down to his physicality, The Wolverine is a broken man, shuffling onto the opening scenes, dragging himself against the worries of the world. Although he is older and wearier of violence, The Wolverine’s anger is unbridled once provoked rendering him even deadlier than ever. Director James Mangold, who directed The Wolverine before Logan, understands the character, and is able to present a darker depiction of The Wolverine, injecting enough levity into the plot to stop Logan delving into melodrama.

Professor X is no longer the leader of the X-Men but an ailing and elderly man who has moments of lucidity. Patrick Stewart always fitted the role of Professor X, but in Logan we see two refreshing sides to the character. Professor X alternates between a caring grandfather figure towards the young mutant Laura (Dafne Keen), to a stern and mainly ungrateful father and mentor to The Wolverine. Both Stewart and Jackson had great chemistry together in earlier X-Men films, but Logan’s focus upon the pair adds to the close relationship these characters have, and how ultimately, they need each other.

Dafne Keen, without revealing too much about her character, is the mirror to The Wolverine. Her youth and rage matches The Wolverine’s weariness and age. While watching her character, she repeats many of the mannerisms, and flaws, of a younger Wolverine, and clearly needs his help to accept who she is.

Despite William Boyd, of Narcos fame, delivering a great turn as head villain Donald Pierce, lacing his role with humour and a clear admiration for mutants, it is Stephen Merchant who surprises as mutant Caliban. Merchant’s performance was refreshingly serious, with his comedic quips only adding to a character who I became quickly attached to. I hope Merchant receives more serious roles as a result of Logan, he definitely has the talent to succeed.

Weird West

Logan is a hybrid of dystopian and Western themes which draws from Rian Johnson’s Looper’s setting and themes of family, love and redemption. It is a credit to Mangold and screenwriter Scott Frank that Logan steps onto well used tropes, but remains unique. By straddling the America-Mexico border, the film subtly comments upon temporary America, juxtaposing the desolate but peaceful Mexico borderlands with the aggressive patriotism and debauchery of El Paso, Texas.

Broad landscape panoramas of Mexican plans cut against well scripted fight scenes that flit between steady cam and fixed camera shots. The car chases scenes take inspiration from Mad Max: Fury Road, delivering moments which appear like a choreographed dance. Pitting The Wolverine and Professor X against The Reavers, mechanically enhanced mercenaries, evens the odds. Every encounter with The Reavers is a hard-won fight, as opposed to earlier X-Men films where it was all too obvious which side would succeed.

Verdict

Not since Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight has a superhero film felt as grounded in realism, where actions have a cost and the characters are not fantastical, but people trying to better the world, however bleak. If you have the time, go see Logan.

Recommended audience: Comic-book lovers, Marvel Fans and anyone who does not want to see a typical blockbuster film.

Hagood’s review:

I couldn’t think of a better send off for my favorite member of the X-Men. This “final” Wolverine film surpassed Superhero clichés in the best way: intense drama. Deadpool & Guardians of the Galaxy both circumvented such clichés, but did so by mocking or over-exaggerating them. After a string of decent Wolverine movies (X-Men Origins: Wolverine & The Wolverine), Logan does more than deliver breathtaking action. It brings intense emotion fueled by complex characters.

The movie starts with a weakened and aged Logan dedicatedly nursing the sick Professor X south of the Mexican border. Neither he nor Professor X have a true purpose in life. Both struggle in their day-to-day lives, but then enters the young and tumultuous mutant, Laura (the debut role of the superb Dafne Keen), who is being hunted by mercenary Donald Pierce (played by rising star, Boyd Holbrook).

Suddenly, these two aging mutants have a purpose to live: Protect the last child of their race.

But the plot goes deeper than “racial” eugenics. It boils down to the fiercest bonds humans share: Family. This is where Logan bests its Marvel and DC brethren. Most gloss over such important bonding elements and instead focus on delivering a massive third-act battle royale, which can be fun, but quickly becomes boring. Logan does both: it packs in several concentrated and extreme battles, but it doesn’t withhold the quiet moments where characters connect.

My only gripe with Logan is that at 2 hours and 17 minutes, it is a bit long. Honestly, I cannot recommend a scene to shorten or cut, so maybe it doesn’t need a cut.

Please, go enjoy this pleasantly deep Marvel film.

Target audience: Teenage males (for the bloody action) and serious movie aficionados

For the trailer follow the link 

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