Future Imperfect (Blade Runner 2049) (2017) -Teaser

All those moments are rebooted in time

A Blade Runner sequel has been rumoured for a long time. I was hoping a sequel would never materialise but we live amidst a swathe of reboots, spin-offs and sequels.

The original Blade Runner was in a reality where human sentience had become mass produced, leading to android slaves who were disposed of and hunted by natural humans. Thirty years later, I felt a nagging wave of irony that Blade Runner 2049 has replaced Harrison Ford, who played the original Blade Runner Deckard, with a younger model. Gosling’s character is an updated Deckard, a version that will may reach Blade Runner 2069 before his own ‘retirement’.

Blade Runner was a complete arc that needed no addition. I am wary that this new film is simply a reboot, the vanguard for a cycle of spin offs which belittle the world penned by the great Phillip.K.Dick.

Many have forgotten that Blade Runner was not a box-office smash. The film has become acclaimed over time due to its influence over following generations of filmmakers, writers, film theorists and other creatives. We live in a time where nostalgia is profitable, but if Blade Runner 2049 will match the original, it will have to bear an intellectual profoundness that is starkly different from the nostalgia action experiences of recent years.

I am disheartened that Ridley Scott is only acting as the executive producer for Blade Runner 2049, but Denis Villeneuve is an excellent director who most know for Sicario. His earlier film, Enemy, starring Jake Gyllenhaal in a tale of doppelgangers, proves that Villeneuve is willing to make films that challenge viewers.

The new film is still going to be set in the 1980’s conception of L.A in the near but radically different future. In the trailer, Gosling’s character ventures outside of L.A., into some hazardous hinterland where the environment has become a dust-bowl. Having read Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? four years before watching Blade Runner, I am curious to see how much of the land beyond L.A will be formed from the book, a world ravaged by Soviet-American nuclear war.

Blade Runner is a statement about existence, reality and whether we can leave a legacy after we die. Every time I watch the original, I am both relieved and unsettled, unable to answer all the questions the film raises. If Blade Runner 2049 does not deliver the same reaction, I hope it is forgotten, like tears in rain.

By Saul Shimmin

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s